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Electronic Dog Training Collars For Obedience

ElectCollarDo you find that you are having problems trying basic obedience or advanced dog training techniques on your dog?  You will be interested in knowing that there are thousands of pet owners out there who are experiencing these problems all of the time.

An electronic dog training collar is a great dog training tool to have, when you want to train your dog to listen to all your commands such as hunting, obedience, and the various dog behavior commands.

Many people mistakenly think that the use of an electric shock collar to train their dog might be somewhat extreme, however their effectiveness when it comes to dog training really cannot be argued. By providing dog trainers and handlers a way to administer just a small electric shock makes possible for just about anybody to train their dog like a professional in a very a rather short period of time, with no harm to the dog.

 How Electronic Dog Training Collars Work

If you don’t know how these electronic dog training collars work, basically the electronic collars work by passing an electronic stimulus that mechanically vibrates the mobile collar, provided the dog is within a range of about one mile. The electronic dog training collar allows the trainer to decide the intensity of the stimulus and also how frequently he wants the dog to feel it. Most  electronic dog training collars available on the market today allow you to adjust the transmitter to fit your needs.

 Electronic Dog Training Collars as Dog Training Tools

Electronic dog training collars are useful dog training tools that do not harm your dog whatsoever. The electric volt that is sent out by electronic dog training collars is nothing more than a mild irritant like what one would experience from static electricity that only serves to startle your dog, while causing him no pain at all.  This is the secret to the dog shock collars’ effectiveness.

Electronic dog training collars can help prevent dangerous activities like your dog chasing cars, or if you just want to establish good dog behavior in public places such as parks. The remote control you get with the collar will give you the ability to immediately correct or reward behaviors in your dog. This provides  feedback that allows your pet to learn very quickly and even helps lead to better communication, not to mention creating a better relationship between you and your pet

Because electronic dog training collars are such good dog training tools, they are used in many types of dog training regimens, such as hunting exercises, agility training, containment to a backyard, anti-barking and more.

The technology of many electronic dog training collars is very advanced. Most dogs will usually respond after only a few dog training sessions and after they have become conditioned, the collars can even be left in the off position.

Want to know where to find electronic dog training collars – click here!

Dog Health Problems Symptoms and Recognizing Them

The one thing that dog owners all over the world have in common is worry about dog health concerns.

It is important to be able to recognize dog health problems and symptoms right away since this can prevent a dog’s condition from deteriorating, and also protect the dog’s health status.  This can include recognizing subtle changes in a dog’s behavior that could point to certain dog health problems, and symptoms.

Dogs, like humans can be susceptible to countless diseases, such as metabolic diseases, viral diseases, bacterial diseases, fungal diseases, parasitic infestations, genetic disorders, physical injuries, although many of  the dog’s health problem symptoms are different and specific to the disease.  But nevertheless there are indicators that can tell their owners that there is a dog health problem present.

Dog can have hereditary, infectious and structural diseases and other dog health disorders.  In fact puppies are usually born with some immunity to diseases, however this soon wanes.  They might also get a antibody rich milk from their mother for a while, however this is usually gone after about 16 to 20 weeks.  That is why vaccinations are important for puppies.   Some dog health problems and diseases are hereditary and cannot be detected until a dog becomes at least 18 months of age.

So what exactly are the typical dog health symptoms to let us know something is wrong?  When should you get your dog to a veterinarian

Well, a healthy dog should have bright cheerful eyes, and should also be full of energy.  The dog should also be enjoying a good diet and appetite. When there is something wrong with the dog’s health there is a change in his attitude.  For instance he might not be focused, attentive when you are talking to him.  He might also not be enjoying his meals as he used to.  A dog’s normally bright eyes might bear an expression of pain, or start to turn cloudy when he is sick.

The dog’s nose may be warm, dry, encrusted, and may bear a discharge of variable nature. The dog could be suffering from intermittent sneezing attacks. There may be a labored cough, very slow breathing, or he could exhibit exhaustion after only a little exercise

It is possible that some changes in diet and some rest can bring improvement in his condition.  However it there is no improvement it may be necessary to have a veterinarian examine the dog.

In the end however, you should make sure that you consult a certified veterinarian about any dog health problems in order to be sure to get the correct diagnosis of your dog’s health problem.   There should be no substitute for the advice of a qualified veterinarian.

Want to know how to recognize  dog health problems and symptoms – click here!

The 5 Basic Dog Obedience Training Commands

One thing to keep in mind before you begin any basic dog obedience training, is to understand that most dogs have an attention span of no more than ten minutes. This is why any training routines you have with your dog or puppy should take place within this ten minute period.

Achieving good basic dog obedience training is in getting your dog or puppy to understand and obey the 5 basic dog obedience training commands. These commands are Sit, Stay, Heel, Come, and Down.
You should also be sure to reward your dog for any correct behavior and keep your basic dog obedience training a positive experience for both of you. Make it as much fun as possible.

In order for your dog to be able to achieve these commands you need to work with your dog each day to reinforce basic dog training skills and behaviors. This is accomplished by using the same dog training commands and hand signals each time.

Want to know the secret to successful basic dog training – click here!

Basic Dog Obedience Training Command Number 1 – Sit

The main object of basic dog obedience training is in getting your dog or puppy to understand and obey the 5 basic dog obedience training commands.  These commands are Sit, Stay, Heel, Come, and Down.

Here we will look at Basic Dog Obedience Training Command 1 – Sit

Teach your dog the action of sitting before labeling it with a command. For instance, before you say, ‘sit’ show him what a sit is. Give him the ‘sit’ command in a firm voice.  Then, be sure to reward him with praise when he has correctly done a sit. After some training, when you will be able to say “sit,” he will know what to do.

Want to know the secret to successful basic dog training – click here!

Basic Dog Obedience Training Command Number 2 – Stay

 

The main object of basic dog obedience training is in getting your dog or puppy to understand and obey the 5 basic dog obedience training commands.  These commands are Sit, Stay, Heel, Come, and Down.

Here we will look at Basic Dog Obedience Training Command 2 – Stay

After you first teach your dog to ‘sit’, you can teach him to ‘stay’. Start by giving a hand signal when you give the command ‘stay’.  Then give your dog the command ‘sit’ to have him sit.  You then put your palm up with fingers closed in front of your dog’s face, about six inches away and give him the ‘stay’ command in a firm voice.  Once again reward him with praise if he keeps staying, and reprimand if he doesn’t.  From this he will learn that it is good to keep the stay and bad if he breaks it.

Want to know the secret to successful basic dog training – click here!

Basic Dog Obedience Training Command Number 3 – Heel

The main object of basic dog obedience training is in getting your dog or puppy to understand and obey the 5 basic dog obedience training commands.  These commands are Sit, Stay, Heel, Come, and Down.

Here we will look at Basic Dog Obedience Training Command 3 – Heel

In basic dog obedience training, the purpose of the ‘heel’ command is to have your dog walk alongside you, instead of in front of you. If a dog does this correctly, the leash remains slack, and the result is that the dog keep to your walking pace.

You can start training your dog to ‘heel’ by putting your dog on a short leash. With the dog by your side facing in the same direction give him the ‘heel’ command using a firm voice. Start walking forward.  If you see that the dog is walking along with you, be sure to praise him. Consistency is important, and your dog needs to realize that he’ll get your enthusiastic praise for correct behavior. If your dog pulls away, or lags, you should use a firm snap of the leash on his collar and reprimand him by saying ‘No’. Remember to always reward him when he does it right.

Want to know the secret to successful basic dog training – click here!

Basic Dog Obedience Training Command Number 4 – Come

The main object of basic dog obedience training is in getting your dog or puppy to understand and obey the 5 basic dog obedience training commands.  These commands are Sit, Stay, Heel, Come, and Down.

Here we will look at Basic Dog Obedience Training Command 4 – Come

Teaching your dog the ‘come’ command is very important as it can provide a solid foundation for trust between you and your dog.  It can also potentially save his life.

Begin training your dog in the command by putting your dog on a leash and bring along some tasty treats that your dog is known to like.

When your dog is a short distance from you, crouch down, open your arms and say ‘Come!’.  He should get excited and come over to you. If not, gently pull him towards you using the leash. When he begins to come on his own, you can stop pulling the leash, and encourage him, and then reward him with a tasty treat, and be sure to praise.

Want to know the secret to successful basic dog training – click here!

Basic Dog Obedience Training Command Number 5 – Down

The main object of basic dog obedience training is in getting your dog or puppy to understand and obey the 5 basic dog obedience training commands.  These commands are Sit, Stay, Heel, Come, and Down.

Here we will look at Basic Dog Obedience Training Command 5 – Down

The down command is a very useful basic dog obedience command to teach your dog. This is another command that can save a dog’s life.  This command should be taught right after your dog has mastered the ‘sit’ command.

As with the other commands treats are an important dog obedience training tool.

First get your dog’s attention by saying his name. Once you have his attention and is already in the sitting position place the treat near his nose allowing him to sniff it.  When your dog starts to nibble on the treat, lower the treat towards the ground, until the dog is in the down position.  When he is laying down, release the treat.

Repeat over and over in short and sharp training sessions until your dog begins to understand the action.

Want to know the secret to successful basic dog training – click here!

What to Do About Your Dogs Digging Habits

When it comes to dogs digging habits there are two extremes of opinion: one, is that a dog is a dog, and we should permit him to express his true canine nature by allowing him free reign
over the yard and flowerbeds; and the second opinion is that a flowerbed is a flowerbed, and no dog should even think about trespassing if it comes at the price of your cherished rosebuds. Many people tend to favor the middle ground.

While it is true that plenty of dogs do love to dig, and it’s healthy for them to be permitted to indulge in this habit from time to time, there’s a difference between permitting your dog to express his inner puppy, and allowing him to run rampant in the yard.

There really is no reason that a dog should have to come at the price of a garden, and vice versa: you can have both. If
your dog’s developed a taste for digging, it’ll just take a bit of time (and some crafty ingenuity) on your part to resolve the issue satisfactorily


Why do dogs dig? In no particular order, here are some of the more common reasons that a dog will dig: 

* Lack of exercise.

Digging is a good way for an under-exercised dog to burn off some of that nervous energy. 

 * Boredom. Bored dogs need something rewarding and interesting to do, to help the time pass by. 

 * Dog Digging is often the ideal solution for a bored dog: it gives him a sense of purpose, and distracts him from an otherwise-empty day. 

* The need for broader horizons. Some dogs are just escape artists by nature – no matter how much exercise and attention they get, it’s nearly impossible to confine them. For many dogs it’s not the digging  itself that’s the reward, it’s the glorious unknown that exists beyond the fenceline. 

*Boredom

If he’s bored, give him some toys and chews to play with during your absence, and wear him out before you leave so he spends most of the day snoozing. 

But if all this doesn’t work try some of these suggestions: 

 * Restrict your dog’s access.

This is the most effective thing you can do: if he’s never in the yard without active supervision, there’s no opportunity for digging. 

* Use nature to help restrict your dog.

If the digging is bothering you because it’s upsetting the more delicate blooms in your garden, plant hardier blossoms: preferably, those with deep roots and thorny defenses. Roses are ideal. 

Accept your dog’s need for an outlet: give him a place to dig.  Set up an area where he’s allowed to dig as much as he pleases. Once this zone’s been established, you can make it clear that there’s to be absolutely no digging in the rest of the yard – and you can enforce your rules with a clear conscience, since you know your dog now has his own little corner of the world to do with  as he chooses. If you don’t have a “spare corner” of the yard, if the whole yard is, grass, flowerbeds, and gravel path, what to do? 

You can get a sandbox, which you can place anywhere in the garden. You can even make a deep one yourself and fill it with a mixture of sand and earth, and put some leaves or grass on top if you like – get your dog interested in it by having a scratch around yourself, until he gets the idea. 

Further reading

For more information on recognizing and dealing with problematic behaviors like digging, chewing, barking, and aggression, check out Secrets to Dog Training. It’s a detailed how-to manual for the responsible owner, and is packed with all the information you’ll need for raising a healthy, happy, well-adjusted pooch: from problem behaviors to dog psychology to obedience work, Secrets to Dog Training has it covered. You can check out Secrets to Dog Training by clicking on this link.

Some Common House Training Problems and How to Solve Them


House training is one of the areas of dog ownership that’s most subject to misunderstanding, confusion, and just plain dread!

Common house training problem #1: Submissive / excited urination

What is it?

A ‘submissive urinator’ is a dog that urinates on the floor and himself (and sometimes on you and others) in situations of extreme excitement or stress – when you return home at the end of the day, or when he’s being told off.

Why does it happen?

Puppies are the usual candidates for submissive/excited urination, but it’s not uncommon to see adult dogs with the problem as well: usually, these are highly sensitive and timid dogs, and/or ones from a shelter/with a history of abuse.

When does it happen?
Situations when an excited/fearful dog is likely to urinate:
– Greeting time after a prolonged absence
– Play time
– The arrival of guests
– Stressful situations at home, arguments
– During a correction
– Sudden loud noises

First of all, you should take him to the vet to make sure there’s no medical reason for the issue (like diabetes or bladder infection.)
Limit his intake of water to help him control his bladder more effectively. Don’t restrict his water intake over a prolonged period of time however.

When greeting your dog, keep it calm. The more excited he is, the harder it is for him to control his bladder, don’t encourage him to get worked up: ignore him for the first few moments, or give him a neutral “hello”, then a quick pat. It’s important that you DO NOT punish or harshly correct your dog for this behavior. It’s not something that he can easily control, and he’s not doing it on purpose. When you catch him in the act, you can give him a firm “No!” followed by praise when he stops, but don’t punish him. Keep your cool, and be sympathetic.

If he urinates out of fear when scolding him for an offense, try to reduce the stress levels  by keeping a firm, but not angry tone. Remember, you’re dealing with a sensitive, high-strung dog: if you get angry or worry him, the problem will worsen.

 

Common house training problem #2: Scent marking

Scent marking – where a dog “marks” his or her territory with urine – is not actually a house training problem, since it’s based on issues of dominance and territoriality not insufficient house training.

But  since the problem centers around the unwanted presence of urine in the house – it seems logical, in a way, to link this problem with house training. Scent marking and lack of house training: how to differentiate between the two.

Your dog’s probably scent marking, not genuinely relieving himself, if:

– The amount of urine produced is rather small, and tends to be directed against vertical surfaces (walls, or doors)

– He’s male, unneutered, and at least five or six months old. Unneutered dogs are much more territorial than neutered ones. Spayed and neutered dogs can also exhibit marking behavior, but it’s relatively infrequent.

– It makes little difference how often he’s taken outside for a toilet break

– He frequently targets items that are new to the house: new possessions, guest clothing/footwear, etc

– You live in a multi-dog household and there is conflict between two or more of the dogs

What to do about the problem?


 

First thing is spay or neuter your dog(s) as soon as you possibly can, ideally six months of age – this often halts marking altogether; but if your dog’s been marking for a prolonged period of time, he may continue to do so after being spayed or neutered, since a pattern of behavior will have been established.

Clean soiled areas thoroughly. Use a non-ammonia based cleaner (because it smells just like urine) no vinegar (it smells similar to urine.) Because dogs tend to re-mark the same places, you’ll need to redefine the places that you know he’s marked to prevent repeat offending.

For more information on how to successfully house train your dog (as well as a whole bunch of in-depth information on house training troubleshooting and related issues) you’ll probably want to check out The Ultimate House Training Guide. I totally recommend it!

It’s the complete dog-house-training guide. The Ultimate House Training Guide and comes highly recommended.

You can visit the The Ultimate House Training Guide site by clicking this link: